8000 cyclotourists pedal in the Mallorca 312 – Giant - Taiwan

8000 cyclotourists pedal in the Mallorca 312 – Giant - Taiwan

The ninth edition of the Mallorca – Giant – Taiwan took off at 7am in front of the Playa de Muro Hotel Association. Heading the peloton was bib number 312, honouree Joaquim Rodríguez, along with Majorcan professional cyclists Lluís Mas and Enric Mas and the Menorcan European champion, Albert Torres. Other illustrious names that did not want to miss the event included Sir Dave Brailsford, the Sky Team manager, and ex-professional cyclists Pedro Horrillo, Joseba Beloki, Toni Tauler and Ángel Edo. The 8000 participants, who have come from 59 countries worldwide, are now riding through the island until they complete their respective distances of 167, 225 and 312 kilometres.

The first cyclotourist to complete the 312 kilometres of the Mallorca 312 – Giant – Taiwan is the Belgian rider Rein Coertjens with a time of eight hours and fifty four minutes, almost half an hour faster than second place, German rider Dominic Aigner and Spanish rider Ramón Ballesteros. Coertjens, who rode alone at the head of the race for 260 kilometres, said: “It wasn’t my intention to escape alone for so many kilometres, but in the final part of the Puig Major climb, everyone started to slow down and I didn’t want to lose my rhythm. I expected someone would catch up to me, but it didn’t happen”. Unsurprisingly, he was very satisfied with the outcome after spending months preparing for this day. The first woman to complete the Mallorca 312 – Giant – Taiwan, is the Spanish rider, Elena Bris Fernández, with a time of ten hours and forty nine minutes.

The first to cross the finish-line in the Mallorca 225-Better in Winter is the German rider Thomas Hoffmeister with a time of six hours and thirty seven minutes. The first woman to complete this challenge is the Belgian rider Astrid Schartmüller, who did so in seven hours and seventeen minutes. The first cyclotourist to complete the 167 kilometres of the Mallorca 167 – Goldcar is British rider Adam Moore, with a time of four hours and forty-three minutes. The first woman, Belgian rider Annick Dirck, crossed the finish-line with a time of five hours and twenty minutes.